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Kenn Hermann

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The writer of Ecclesiastes was surely right: of the writing of books, essays, — and blogs there is no end. Thus, it is a bit embarrassing to think of cluttering up bandwidth with yet another blog. Nevertheless, I do have a few reasons for starting. Whether these are ‘good’ reasons is for my reader(s) to determine. First, I teach an online course on “Technology and Society,” so there are professional reasons to gain some first-hand experience with this medium for myself, my students, and for those with whom I make contact. Second, I have a wide range of interests that often lack a ready audience among my immediate circle. Editors always want to know ‘who’s your audience?.’ But, this medium seems to make it possible for an interested audience to find me. If that happens, that will be worth it.

This is a miscellany ….. Expect entries ranging from the just war and Iraq to Herman Dooyeweerd’s philosophy to Intelligent Design to favorite old books to the philosophy of technology to the implications of following Christ in a consumer culture and academia to musings on history to . . . . You get the idea, very little is out of bounds. It will also be occasional, as workload and the Muse dictate.

I see myself as a provocateur in the classroom. I enjoy probing, challenging, provoking my students — all in love, of course. I anticipate doing much the same in my blogs — cutting ‘against the grain’ of readers’ expectations. Perhaps, just maybe, there is one other person out there who says, “ah ha, there IS someone else out there who is thinking along similar lines or has put into words what I have been feeling and thinking.”

The name of my blog, ‘Radix,’ comes from the Latin, meaning root (e.g. radical, radish) It has been commonly used by Christians to refer to their being deeply rooted in Jesus Christ. That’s what I strive to be. There is just enough of the 60’s in me yet to feel comfortable with the radicality of being a follower of Jesus Christ. Oftentimes being ‘radical’ means going ‘against the grain’ of the expectations of both modern ‘radicals’ and Christians.

Let’s see . . . I’m a husband, grandfather, history professor, amateur (but enthusiastic) golfer, bookseller, and . . . . , all done in the service of Jesus, the Christ. To narrow (or broaden) it a bit, I am a U.S. historian with a Ph.D. in intellectual history. My interests lie at the congested intersection of history, philosophy, theology, science, technology, and politics. If you wonder how these are related, stay tuned. My current research interest is in 19th c. history of science and religion. Yes, that means Darwin.

If you would like to contact me off-line, please feel free to email me at khermann@neo.rr.com.

I would be delighted if you find any of my material useful, so feel free to use it. Just follow accepted protocol and acknowledge your sources. Some of this material may eventually end up in more permanent form.

Responses

  1. While there is a lot of junk to wade through when searching for serendipity with the “next blog” button above, it was all worth it today when I found your blog.
    I am a new blogger (internetsophism.wordpress.com) and I am looking for publications/blogs with similar interests. I am a reluctant (post-?) Evangelical, have a philosophy degree, and work in ecommerce, so your blog seems to strike a certain familiarity with me.
    Good stuff. I look forward to reading more in the coming days.

  2. Mr. Hermann,
    I am a middle school history teacher who has been pondering the idea of teaching 8th grade history in reverse. I read your article, “The Pedagogical Strengths of Teaching History Backwards,” with great interest. While I’d be happy to write my own plan, it seems that this would be reinventing the wheel. Would you be willing to provide course outlines of your US history courses for my use? Thank you for your consideration.
    Chris Herold
    Pilgrim Lutheran School
    Beaverton, OR

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  4. Hello, I am a high school teacher-librarian in Canada. I have read your piece about teaching history “backwards” and request permission to re-post it here,
    http://www.bestlibrary.org/new/2008/03/first—find-th.html

    It fits in beautifully with a site I am preparing for my teachers – to infuse currency, news into the classroom. I have shared it with my history teachers who are also excited at your concept. Thanks, Judith


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